siesonchange:

Why do I look at every Iris x Barry scene and I’m like, “Kiss her. Kiss her. Oh my God, kiss her.” 

imagineyouricon:

Imagine your icon giving you forehead kisses and resting their chin on your head.


Kristen Stewart by Tom Munro for Elle Magazine June 2012

Kristen Stewart by Tom Munro for Elle Magazine June 2012

disneyismyescape:

carry-on-until-its-gone:

wish-upon-the-disney-star:

This scene is SO important. Maleficent is with someone she trusts, someone she considers a friend. And then the next thing she knows, she wakes up in pain, bleeding, with her wings burned off. A huge part of her has been destroyed.

Rape is so prominent in our culture that it is in a Disney movie. Maybe not explicitly, but it is very clear what this scene represents and it is so sad.

I fucking cried my eyes out during this scene

AJ even confirmed that this is what this scene was a metaphor for (x) - just because i saw someone say today that this is not what this scene is about

'We were very conscious that it was a metaphor for rape': The actress explained how the scene in which her character has her wings ripped off her body while in a drug-induced sleep had to be something 'so violent and aggressive' that it would make her 'lose all sense of her maternity, her womanhood and her softness' 

shoorm:

The East Asian women + colored hair trope
(An extension of extraextraex’s post.)
Looking at the pictures above, it’s pretty easy to find the similarities. East Asian women with dyed purple/blue/red hair, usually in a streak. No matter how you look at this, this is an uncomfortably specific trend in media. Yeah, it looks cute, but after seeing this over and over again, it becomes a boring, racist trope. This originated from a variety of possibilities: the creators trying to “Americanize” the East Asian character, make them more “exotic”, or to show how unique this character is. She’s not a giggling schoolgirl or a delicate lotus flower, she’s different! See, she has a streak of purple hair (god forbid she dyes it any other color), look how radical that is, look at our modern Dragon Lady!
And yes, Knives dyed her hair to look like Ramona, and yes, Somni-451’s hair is like that to mark her as a clone, but these characters do not exist in a vacuum. You can justify why a character has a specific appearance, but in the end, this character was created, and contributes to stereotypes no matter the intent.
So the moral of this story is that your Asian character with a strip of purple hair isn’t original. It isn’t unique. No matter how innocent this appears to be, it can be detrimental to East Asian girls, since the characters that look like them have the same exact traits. It’s time to explore different ways of designing East Asian characters, instead of just slapping on some purple and calling it a day.




Don’t know

shoorm:

The East Asian women + colored hair trope

(An extension of extraextraex’s post.)

Looking at the pictures above, it’s pretty easy to find the similarities. East Asian women with dyed purple/blue/red hair, usually in a streak. No matter how you look at this, this is an uncomfortably specific trend in media. Yeah, it looks cute, but after seeing this over and over again, it becomes a boring, racist trope. This originated from a variety of possibilities: the creators trying to “Americanize” the East Asian character, make them more “exotic”, or to show how unique this character is. She’s not a giggling schoolgirl or a delicate lotus flower, she’s different! See, she has a streak of purple hair (god forbid she dyes it any other color), look how radical that is, look at our modern Dragon Lady!

And yes, Knives dyed her hair to look like Ramona, and yes, Somni-451’s hair is like that to mark her as a clone, but these characters do not exist in a vacuum. You can justify why a character has a specific appearance, but in the end, this character was created, and contributes to stereotypes no matter the intent.

So the moral of this story is that your Asian character with a strip of purple hair isn’t original. It isn’t unique. No matter how innocent this appears to be, it can be detrimental to East Asian girls, since the characters that look like them have the same exact traits. It’s time to explore different ways of designing East Asian characters, instead of just slapping on some purple and calling it a day.

Don’t know
HAPPY BIRTHDAY, SMALLVILLE
The longest-running superhero series in television history made its debut back on October 16, 2001, on the WB with 8.4 million viewers.

departurelane:

Bottles for Bags

 

Just because it’s a bottle doesn’t mean it should be round.

Memobottle

The Doctor doesn’t stay for dinner and he doesn’t go back to visit his companions after they’ve left him. When Martha calls to say she needed help with something, that was one thing, but he doesn’t go around making social calls. It’s makes the pain of loneliness even worse every time he has to leave them behind again.

I’m the only one I’ve ever heard of with p o w e r s like mine.

cubebreaker:

Former Marine turned photographer Joel Parés’ series Judging America used real people dressed as stereotypes to remind us to not judge a person based on their tattoos, clothing, ethnicity, profession, or sexual orientation, but on their merits.

themarysue:

actionjacksonlovesbbq:

I wish more cartoons taught young girls that if a man harasses you or annoys you or whatever you should blow him up with a bazooka and feel no remorse :)))

Harley and Ivy, making friends.